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Vitamin B12


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#1 schmb01

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Posted 13 May 2008 - 07:16 PM

Another interesting thing about vitamin deficiencies, this one being B12. The norm is 200-1100 PG/ML, BUT, there was a note at the bottom of my recent labs that reads:

PLEASE NOTE: ALTHOUGH THE REFERENCE RANGE FOR VITAMIN B12 IS 200-1100 PG/ML, IT HAS BEEN REPORTED THAT BETWEEN 5 AND 10% OF PATIENTS WITH VALUES BETWEEN 200-400 PG/ML MAY EXPERIENCE NEUROPSYCHIATRIC AND HEMATOLOGIC ABNORMALITIES DUE TO OCCULT B12 DEFICIENCY; LESS THAN 1% OF PATIENTS WITH VALUES ABOVE 400 PG/ML WILL HAVE SYMPTOMS.

Here is a snippet from a link that I will post: Vitamin B12 deficiency
Studies have shown that a deficiency of vitamin B12 can lead to abnormal neurologic and psychiatric symptoms. These symptoms may include: ataxia (shaky movements and unsteady gait), muscle weakness, spasticity, incontinence, hypotension (low blood pressure), vision problems, dementia, psychoses, and mood disturbances. Researchers report that these symptoms may occur when vitamin B12 levels are just slightly lower than normal and are considerably above the levels normally associated with anemia. People at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency include strict vegetarians, elderly people, and people with increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with pregnancy, thyrotoxicosis, hemolytic anemia, hemorrhage, malignancy, liver or kidney disease. Administering vitamin B12 orally, intramuscularly, or intranasally is effective for preventing and treating dietary vitamin B12 deficiency.

Here is the link: http://www.mayoclini... ... vitaminb12

I have talked to other people that have looked into this, and they are finding links to chronic fatigue and other auto immune types of disorders due to low levels of B12. My level is 316. So, I bought some sublingual tabs today. Many people get the shots intramuscularly, but no thanks. When you take a supplement, it doesn't absorb as well as sublingually or via a shot, and the link explains why.

#2 schmb01

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Posted 18 May 2008 - 01:55 PM

Okay, I'm on a new mission, in addition to wanting Cymbalta off of the market, I think everyone should get more educated about the effects of low B12 levels. I ordered a book written by a husband wife team, who are a nurse and doctor respectively, and the information is astounding! The name of the book is "Could it be B12?"

Low levels of B12 can have very, very serious effects on your mental, cardio, neurological and musculoskeletal system. It is tied to many illnesses, or people are often misdiagnosed with illnesses that are actually a b12 deficiency. They point out that b12 is not the magic bullet, as many people have these same illnesses without a deficiency, but the point is, doctors are quick to order expensive tests or throw medications at elderly people, thinking "they are old", when a simple $70 test for a urinary MMR level may uncover a deficiency that could be taken care of with an intramuscular injection.

My son in law's grandmother began expereincing fatigue, some dementia, and what they believed to be internal bleeding of unknown source. It was finally determined that she had pernicious anemia, caused by a b12 deficiency, and once she began getting inections, she came back to the vibrant woman she once was. The dementia cleared within a month.

It is also important if your b12 levels are low, verified by the urinary test, to have your homocystiene levels checked, because they may also be high, and this puts people at a much higher risk for heart attack, tia (mini strokes) and congestive heart failure.

Deficiencies in b12 can also manifest itself via depression, manic moods, paranoia and anti social behaviors.

Again, b12 isn't the be all cure all, but why not have a simple test performed to see if it is as easy as an injection of a vitamin your body needs to function on so many levels? I'm getting the test done, and I'm going to insist that both of my parents be tested too. It makes me wonder if my lingering/mild depression is from my low levels of this.

Sorry for the rant, I'm just being constantly amazed by what I am reading, and these people are not trying to sell anything, no suplements, no magic cure, they are just raising awareness to something that could be a lifesaver for many people, and to allow some elderly people to live with more dignity.

#3 Lori

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 09:04 AM

I may have to invest in that book, Schmb01, and thanks for information. I am all for a simple fix for what ails me, but as you pointed out, it may NOT be the cure, or the fix....you continue to remind us we need our seratonin levels, Vitamin D level, and now our B 12 checked BEFORE we take things into our own hands, so to speak. But once we get those things tested, and something happens to be low, we now have the knowledge of helping ourselves via vitamins.

#4 DixieDaisy

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 10:26 PM

Lori, I totally agree about Vitamin 12. I was recently diagnosed with B12 deficiency and I can't begin to say how much better I feel since I have been getting my B12 shots!

I had No energy, was in a brain fog with no interest as my housework piled up around me! My dr gave me a shot a week for three weeks and then a shot a month thereafter. I will have my third monthly shot next week. I feel like a new woman!

Besides that, I was on my way to being anemic because of my B12 deficiency. My depression is better now.

I'm sold on the need for a routine complete check up!

Daisy

#5 schmb01

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 11:41 PM

Daisy, I'm so glad they found your deficiency and got you treated! The things I read in that book were just astounding to me. Being low in b12 can have huge, wide spread consequences. Good for you!!

#6 DixieDaisy

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 12:07 PM

Thanks Schmbo1! I was so happy to find out that was what was wrong with me. lol I knew something was wrong but had never felt quite like that before and couldn't put my finger on what was wrong.

I looked for the book you mentioned online at Barnes and Noble but they didn't have it. I meant to look for it at Books a Million too but forgot. Brain fog from depression or the Cymbalta, don't know which. *sigh* Is the book out of print?

Thanks!

Daisy

#7 schmb01

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 05:47 PM

I got mine from Amazon. Here is the link: http://www.amazon.co... ... 1884956467

Babby

#8 DixieDaisy

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 03:52 PM

I may call BAM and see if they have it in stock. We have one in town. If not, I'll order it from B & N, there are a couple of other books I have on my wish list anyway so I won't have to pay shipping charges. :D

Thanks, Babby!

#9 Lori

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Posted 01 July 2008 - 07:52 AM

DixieDaisy,
Forgive me if you have posted this information somewhere else, but are you currently taking Cymbalta or weaning off of it?
I am very glad you were teseted. I have yet to be tested. Right now I am in the process of finding a new general doctor. Mine has suddenly decided to go back to his home town. I have run out of my B Complex, and have just not had it on my priority list to pick up more, but I have been kinda sluggish this week but I feel great in every other area....soooo, I am thinking I should pick up some more, ASAP!!!

Babby, I dont know if you read my other post in regards to me not taking the Positive Mood Formula anymore, but actually I feel very good! I have not had one since Saturday. So this is a big plus for me.

Lori

#10 DixieDaisy

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 07:01 PM

Hi Lori

I just posted to you in another area about my new grandson! lol I'm late responding but he is a beautiful reason!

I'm waiting until my third and youngest son gets home from Iraq later this summer before attempting to wean off Cymbalta. The other two boys are home now, thank God! The oldest is the father of the newborn (he has a two year old daughter). I don't think I can breathe properly until the last one gets home!

Who puts out the Positive Mood Formula you spoke of? Do you buy it at an herbal store or is it something available at a drug store or Wal Mart?

Thanks,

Daisy

P.S. Babby, I did get the B12 book you spoke and you are right, it's scary! :shock:

#11 DixieDaisy

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 02:54 PM

Babby and Lori, I think we got off topic on another thread and started talking about B12 and "the Book" so I brought it back to this thread. lol I think I have conveniced my hubby about B12 and he had his checked today. I was with him so I made sure the dr ordered the MMA test. *Daisy pats herself on the back* *grin* We should know in a few days what the test shows.

Daisy

#12 Attorney_Victim

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Posted 24 July 2008 - 02:01 PM

What is the "MMR Test" you guys are refering too??

#13 DixieDaisy

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 12:05 AM

MMA is the abbreviation for the medical term for the more sensitive, more accurate test for Vitamin B12 deficiency. ;)

Daisy

#14 Angela of Green

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 12:40 AM

I HAVE to look into this! The first post is exactly how I've been feeling for 4 days...and it's no fun :)

#15 Angela of Green

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 12:43 AM

Another double post... :)

Can I fix any deficiencies I have with a multi vitamin? or will they have to do the urine test?

#16 DixieDaisy

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 02:04 PM

Angela, in the book they say that taking a vitamin B12 is like trying to empty the ocean one teaspoon a day. The reason for the MMA test is that taking a vitamin B12 pill or vitamin fortified cereal will fool the general test. By the time a problem shows up with that test, you can have a problem with your white blood count and maybe pernicious anemia.

The MMA costs more but it is more accurate. Since insurance companies prefer 'cheaper' to accurate, this one isn't routinely run. :) A case of penny wise and pound foolish considering the high cost of the problems a lack of Vitamin B12 causes in a person's life. But you can request your dr to run the MMA, he just won't 'routinely do it'.

Daisy

:D

#17 lockheart

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 02:03 AM

Another interesting thing about vitamin deficiencies, this one being B12. The norm is 200-1100 PG/ML, BUT, there was a note at the bottom of my recent labs that reads:

PLEASE NOTE: ALTHOUGH THE REFERENCE RANGE FOR VITAMIN B12 IS 200-1100 PG/ML, IT HAS BEEN REPORTED THAT BETWEEN 5 AND 10% OF PATIENTS WITH VALUES BETWEEN 200-400 PG/ML MAY EXPERIENCE NEUROPSYCHIATRIC AND HEMATOLOGIC ABNORMALITIES DUE TO OCCULT B12 DEFICIENCY; LESS THAN 1% OF PATIENTS WITH VALUES ABOVE 400 PG/ML WILL HAVE SYMPTOMS.

Here is a snippet from a link that I will post: Vitamin B12 deficiency
Studies have shown that a deficiency of vitamin B12 can lead to abnormal neurologic and psychiatric symptoms. These symptoms may include: ataxia (shaky movements and unsteady gait), muscle weakness, spasticity, incontinence, hypotension (low blood pressure), vision problems, dementia, psychoses, and mood disturbances. Researchers report that these symptoms may occur when vitamin B12 levels are just slightly lower than normal and are considerably above the levels normally associated with anemia. People at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency include strict vegetarians, elderly people, and people with increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with pregnancy, thyrotoxicosis, hemolytic anemia, hemorrhage, malignancy, liver or kidney disease. Administering vitamin B12 orally, intramuscularly, or intranasally is effective for preventing and treating dietary vitamin B12 deficiency.

Here is the link: <!-- m -->http://www.mayoclini...m/health/vitami ... vitaminb12<!-- m -->

I have talked to other people that have looked into this, and they are finding links to chronic fatigue and other auto immune types of disorders due to low levels of B12. My level is 316. So, I bought some sublingual tabs today. Many people get the shots intramuscularly, but no thanks. When you take a supplement, it doesn't absorb as well as sublingually or via a shot, and the link explains why.



Yes, and most of people who are at risk with this are those vegetarians. My friend who was diagnosed with b12 deficiency later on get well when she use this mouth spray http://products.merc...amin-b12-spray/, great stuff!



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