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New Here, Life Ruined By Cymbalta For 9 Years


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#61 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 07 March 2017 - 12:01 AM

I started out with 50 mg. and was still wide awake  anxious two hours later.  Hopefully  I will settle down once I get into somewhat of a pattern of sleeping earlier every night, its probably just the norm being anxious every night.

 

What does the caffeine do, Ive been drinking a few cups of tea every morning in order to get my eyes to open, so is it typical to have more of a reaction to caffeine when you are tapering off of Cymbalta?


#62 fishinghat

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 09:29 AM

Yes, caffeine is a neural stimulant and effects serotonin and melatonin levels which, obviously, is  a problem, BUT it also keeps you body from readjusting to controlling its own neurotransmitters.


#63 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 09 March 2017 - 12:29 PM

Ive been struggling with anxiety at night and insomnia/fatigue. The hydroxyzine seems to be causing anxiety and heart pounding during the day. Yesterday, I had an update appointment with my sleep Dr. who I see for sleep apnea and he has been trying to help me get my sleep hours turned around. 

 

I believe my sleep apnea could be from the Cymbalta because even during the day, I have shallow breathing to the point where I think I stop breathing. I had mentioned this to my husband for the last several years while Ive been taking C.

 

Long story short, I had a full blown anxiety attack in the office because he started off by looking at my sleep charting and asked why my hours are all messed up again.  I tried to tell him that I have more anxiety with decreasing the cymbalta and he just kept up his mantra about bedtime hygeine. But my CPAP alone causes increased anx. and I cant even wear it since I started decreasing C.  

 

I told him I havent ever taken any sleep med until the last month because of my daughters trouble with Ambien.  He said actually, that Ambien is actually the best med for me right now. (He doesnt ever prescribe Ambien to kids, yes we all know that now, but it was a new drug 17 yrs ago)

 

Anyways, when I left I was so upset that he wouldnt listed to me, I tried to tell him that I have NO life right now, and I want to be well. I barely leave the house, even at home I do very little. He just wanted to stick to his spiel that he tells everyone who walks through the door.  The nursing staff were all lined up watching me leave and they took me to a different door to exit the building.

 

When I got to my car I called to see if I could get into see my Psy. earlier than next week, and they said had an opening in a couple of hours. I was still really anxious.   I dont know, this was a new experience for me, but Im pretty sure it was a panic attack, so when I went in to see my Psy. it didnt go much better.  She doesnt think all these symptoms are necessarily from the C. She doesnt seem to think that my shallow breathing, and insomnia, etc are necessarily from the C. and she told me not to spend too much time reading stuff on the internet, as it can really get into your head.  I told her it was the first time I have found anyone who seemed to understand what is going on with me. ( Reading these forums, etc.)   She was open to trying the Ambien and wrote me a prescription. I feel ok about trying it because my daughter and I are very different in how we react to meds, and I know that if I have any weird episodes like sleep walking etc, I will stop. Psy. last statement was "I think you need to sleep". 

 

All this to say that I have been sitting awake nights for  almost 10 years, patiently waiting to get better, Ive never taken anything for sleep until now and I think if I can get to a better nighttime schedule and not worry about now long it will take be to get to sleep I will start to relax and handle bedtime without meds very soon.

I really needed for someone to see my horribly anxious state, that lasted for several hours, and help me calm down, neither Dr. seemed to have the experience to do that.  

I did go home and took a Benedryl, and slept with that all night. And later in the evening I wrote a plan for the next time I might have this intense of an episode.

 

I really apologize this is so long, I am desperate to continue weaning off of C and find sleep too.  But I feel very let down by the medical community when I was very vulnerable. Thank you for listening and any thoughts you might share.


#64 fishinghat

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 01:46 PM

Paragraph 1 - Yes, it is rare but hydroxyzine can cause that.

Paragraph 2 - This feeling is fairly frequent among people taking anxiety/depression meds and is usually caused by low blood pressure. To check and see if this is the case get out you BP cuff and put it on. Lay still in bed for 3 to 5 minutes and then take your blood pressure. Nearly all psych meds lower BP.

Paragraph 3 - Absolutely right you are. Your dr is not familiar with withdrawal insomnia.

Paragraph 4 - Your dr is an idiot. The drug insert for Cymbalta is at (an FDA website and published by the manufacturer)

https://dailymed.nlm...f2-c185fbad64ba

It Says......

"5.7 Discontinuation of Treatment with CYMBALTA
Discontinuation symptoms have been systematically evaluated in patients taking CYMBALTA. Following abrupt or tapered discontinuation in adult placebo-controlled clinical trials, the following symptoms occurred at 1% or greater and at a significantly higher rate in CYMBALTA-treated patients compared to those discontinuing from placebo: dizziness, headache, nausea, diarrhea, paresthesia, irritability, vomiting, insomnia, anxiety, hyperhidrosis, and fatigue."

During marketing of other SSRIs and SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), there have been spontaneous reports of adverse events occurring upon discontinuation of these drugs, particularly when abrupt, including the following: dysphoric mood, irritability, agitation, dizziness, sensory disturbances (e.g., paresthesias such as electric shock sensations), anxiety, confusion, headache, lethargy, emotional lability, insomnia, hypomania, tinnitus, and seizures. Although these events are generally self-limiting, some have been reported to be severe.

Patients should be monitored for these symptoms when discontinuing treatment with CYMBALTA. A gradual reduction in the dose rather than abrupt cessation is recommended whenever possible. If intolerable symptoms occur following a decrease in the dose or upon discontinuation of treatment, then resuming the previously prescribed dose may be considered. Subsequently, the physician may continue decreasing the dose but at a more gradual rate [see Dosage and Administration (2.7)]."

Print off this info and give it to the drs. I try to give valid information from the manufacturer, FDA or medical research article and do not rely on subjective info very often and when I do I will state so. The information on Cymbalta withdrawal is in the medical literature and I will post some more. Print them off and take them to the dr and ask if he thinks valid medical research and the FDA are "internet propaganda".

You will find that many of the following medical journal articles list the withdrawal symptoms including insomnia.

Withdrawal Symptoms.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/24515685

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/24298592

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22718702

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18633745

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20975823

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/16266753

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2963463/

http://www.jcdr.net/...1619_6_4_11.pdf

http://triggered.clo...401230802177664

http://www.expertbri...nuing-cymbalta/

http://xa.yimg.com/k...e/dizziness.pdf


http://www.prohealth...cfm?libid=18811


https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/26022117
Cymbalta causing oral lesions.

http://neuro.psychia...opsych.12110265
Long-term duloxetine withdrawal syndrome and management in a depressed patient.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4713700/
Effects of duloxetine on microRNA expression profile in frontal lobe and hippocampus in a mouse model of depression
Our data showed that miRNA expression profile in frontal lobe and hippocampus was affected by duloxetine in mice model of depression. The effect was especially pronounced in the hippocampus, suggesting that hippocampus might be the action site of duloxetine, which presumably worked by regulating the expression of miRNA levels.
(This study shows the direct effect of Cymbalta on miRNA (used in translating DNA code) in the hippocampus (one of the emotional centers in the brain). This could help expplain the extreme number of symptoms developed during withdrawal.

http://www.fda.gov/d...e/UCM172866.pdf


http://www.karger.co...icle/PDF/371865


#65 fishinghat

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 01:58 PM

Paragraph 5 - Good for you. This dr is way out of step with the issues with the withdrawal and Cymbalta warnings and such. Remember, he works for YOU. Fire him and get a different one that knows what he is doing. You may even have to try a few but your health is worth it.

 

Last few paragraphs - Many of use have been through this. You can take clonidine with hydroxyzine (if you stay with it). It is extremely effective against anxiety and panic attacks. Something to talk to your dr about, I would also recommend a good therapist who can teach you techniques to control breathing, heart rate and other anxiety issues. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is the therapy that deals with this and can be very effective. I will also post a document that my therapist gave to me to help me deal with my sleep issues and it has helped a lot.

 

PS. - I think my fingers are getting shorter from typing.  lol


#66 fishinghat

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 02:04 PM

How to Sleep Better

Tips for Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

Tip 1: Keep a regular sleep schedule

Getting back in sync with your body’s natural sleep–wake cycle—your circadian rhythm (daily rhythm)—is one of the most important strategies for achieving good sleep. If you keep a regular sleep schedule, going to bed and getting up at the same time each day, you will feel much more refreshed and energized than if you sleep the same number of hours at different times. This holds true even if you alter your sleep schedule by only an hour or two. Consistency is important.

Set a regular bedtime. Go to bed at the same time every night. Try not to break this routine on weekends when it may be tempting to stay up late. No more than 15 minutes earlier or later each day.

Wake up at the same time every day. If you’re getting enough sleep, you should wake up naturally without an alarm. If you need an alarm clock to wake up on time, you may need to set an earlier bedtime. As with your bedtime, try to maintain your regular wake–time even on weekends.

Nap to make up for lost sleep. If you need to make up for a few lost hours, use a daytime nap rather than sleeping late. DO NOT NAP MORE THAN 1 HOUR PER DAY as it may affect your evenings sleep. DO NOT NAP AFTER 5 PM. The best time to nap is early afternoon.

Fight after–dinner drowsiness. If you find yourself getting sleepy way before your bedtime, get off the couch and do something mildly stimulating to avoid falling asleep, such as washing the dishes, calling a friend, or getting clothes ready for the next day. If you give in to the drowsiness, you may will usually wake up later in the night and have trouble getting back to sleep.

Tip 2: Naturally regulate your sleep-wake cycle

Melatonin is your naturally produced hormone that regulates your sleep. Melatonin production is controlled by light exposure. Your brain will secrete more in the evening, as it becomes darker, Conversely, during the day your brain detects increasing light levels and begins producing serotonin, which causes one to wake and be alert.

Spending long days in an office away from natural light, for example, can impact your daytime wakefulness and make your brain sleepy. Then bright lights at night—especially from hours spent in front of the TV or computer screen—can suppress your body’s production of melatonin and make it harder to sleep. However, there are ways for you to naturally regulate your sleep-wake cycle, boost your body’s production of melatonin, and keep your brain on a healthy schedule.

Increase light exposure during the day
Remove your sunglasses in the morning and let light onto your face.
Spend more time outside during daylight. Try to take your work breaks outside in sunlight, exercise outside, or walk your dog during the day instead of at night.
Let as much light into your home/workspace as possible. Keep curtains and blinds open during the day.

Boost melatonin production at night
Turn off your television and computer. Many people use the television to fall asleep or relax at the end of the day. Not only does the light suppress melatonin production, but television can actually stimulate the mind, rather than relaxing it. Try listening to music or audio books instead, or practicing relaxation. If your favorite TV show is on late at night, record it for viewing earlier in the day.

Don’t read from a backlit device at night (such as an iPad). If you use a portable electronic device to read, use an eReader that is not backlit, i.e. one that requires an additional light source such as a bedside lamp.

Change your light bulbs. Avoid bright lights before bed, after 7 PM do not use a light greater than 25 watts. Reduce light exposure by significantly reducing the brightness on your TV or electronic device.

When it’s time to sleep, make sure the room is dark. The darker it is, the better you’ll sleep. Cover electrical displays, use heavy curtains or shades to block light from windows, or try an eye mask to cover your eyes. Most patients with chronic problems blacken their bedrooms entirely. Do not use nightlights if it can be done safely. Block all windows in the bedroom so light can not enter.

Tip 3: Create a relaxing bedtime routine

If you make a consistent effort to relax and unwind before bed, you will sleep easier and more deeply. A peaceful bedtime routine sends a powerful signal to your brain that it’s time to wind down and let go of the day’s stresses.

Keep noise down. If you can’t avoid or eliminate noise from barking dogs, loud neighbors, city traffic, or other people in your household, try masking it with a fan, recordings of soothing sounds, or white noise. You can buy a special sound machine or generate your own white noise by setting your radio between stations. Earplugs may also help. Sound machines can be purchased at local department stores.

Keep your room cool. The temperature of your bedroom also affects sleep. Most people sleep best in a slightly cool room. A bedroom that is too hot or too cold can interfere with quality sleep.

Make sure your bed is comfortable. You should have enough room to stretch and turn comfortably. If you often wake up with a sore back or an aching neck, you may need to invest in a new mattress or a try a different pillow. Experiment with different levels of mattress firmness, foam or egg crate toppers, and pillows that provide more support.


Relaxing bedtime rituals to try
Read a book or magazine by a soft light
Take a warm bath
Listen to soft music
Do some easy stretches
Wind down with a favorite hobby
Listen to books on tape
Make simple preparations for the next day
DO NOT exercise or do any significant physical activity after 6 PM. Anything considered work (laundry, dishes, etc) must be avoided after 6 PM.

Tip 4: Eat right and get regular exercise

Your daytime eating and exercise habits play a role in how well you sleep. It’s particularly important to watch what you put in your body in the hours leading up to your bedtime.

Stay away from big meals at night. Try to make dinnertime earlier in the evening, and avoid heavy, rich foods within two hours of bed. Fatty foods take a lot of work for your stomach to digest and may keep you up. Also be cautious when it comes to spicy or acidic foods in the evening, as they can cause stomach trouble and heartburn.

Avoid alcohol before bed. Many people think that a nightcap before bed will help them sleep. While it may make you fall asleep faster, alcohol reduces your sleep quality, waking you up later in the night. To avoid this effect, so stay away from alcohol in the hours before bed.

Eliminate caffeine. You might be surprised to know that caffeine can cause sleep problems up to ten to twelve hours after drinking it! No chocolate, most teas, coffee.

Avoid drinking too many liquids in the evening. Drinking lots of water, juice, tea, or other fluids may result in frequent bathroom trips throughout the night. Caffeinated drinks, which act as diuretics, only make things worse.

Quit smoking. Smoking causes sleep troubles in numerous ways. Nicotine is a stimulant, which disrupts sleep. Additionally, smokers actually experience nicotine withdrawal as the night progresses, making it hard to sleep.

Eliminate stimulants. No sugars, salty food or MSG. Sugar is a stimulant which can increase blood pressure and pulse. It can take significant time to process this material and slow down your metabolism. Salts like table salt and MSG provide sodium which is used by the body to help carry electrical system in our bodies. This can also increase heart rates and metabolism for several hours.

If you’re hungry at bedtime
For some people, a light snack before bed can help promote sleep. When you pair tryptophan–containing foods with carbohydrates, it may help calm the brain and allow you to sleep better. For others, eating before bed can lead to indigestion and make sleeping more difficult. Experiment with your food habits to determine your optimum evening meals and snacks. If you need a bedtime snack, try:
A small bowl of whole–grain, low–sugar cereal
Granola with low–fat milk or yogurt
A banana (not sugary fruits)

You’ll also sleep more deeply if you exercise regularly. As little as twenty to thirty minutes of daily activity helps. And you don’t need to do all thirty minutes in one session. You can break it up into five minutes here, ten minutes there, and still get the benefits. Try a brisk walk, a bicycle ride, or even gardening or housework. Serious exercise, even small amounts, must be done before 6 PM.

Some people prefer to schedule exercise in the morning or early afternoon as exercising too late in the day can stimulate the body, raising its temperature.

Tip 5: Get anxiety and stress in check

Do you find yourself unable to sleep or waking up night after night? Residual stress, worry, and anger from your day can make it very difficult to sleep well. When you wake up or can’t get to sleep, take note of what seems to be the recurring theme. That will help you figure out what you need to do to get your stress and anger under control during the day:
If you can’t stop yourself from worrying, especially about things outside your control, you need to learn how to manage your thoughts. When trying to go to sleep it is essential not to think about work, money, your family’s problems or other stressful subjects. These are very detrimental to sleep. Do not think about exciting subjects (a vacation, your favorite hobbies, etc.). Instead pick something mundane (boring). Pick a subject like weeding you garden, cleaning your car, etc. It will be difficult to stay focused on these boring subjects at first but it will become easier with time and practice.

If the stress of managing work, family, or school is keeping you awake, you need help with stress management. By learning how to manage your time effectively, handle stress in a productive way, and maintain a calm, positive outlook, you’ll be able to sleep better at night.

Relaxation techniques for better sleep

Deep breathing. Close your eyes—and try taking deep, slow breaths—making each breath even deeper than the last.
Progressive muscle relaxation. Starting at your toes, tense all the muscles as tightly as you can, then completely relax. Work your way up from your feet to the top of your head.
Visualizing a peaceful, restful place. Close your eyes and imagine a place or activity that is calming and peaceful for you. Concentrate on how relaxed this place or activity makes you feel.

Tip 6: Ways to get back to sleep
It’s normal to wake briefly during the night. In fact, a good sleeper won’t even remember it. But if you’re waking up during the night and having trouble falling back asleep, the following tips may help.

Stay out of your head. Hard as it may be, try not to stress over the fact that you’re awake or your inability to fall asleep again, because that very stress and anxiety encourages your body to stay awake.

Make relaxation your goal, not sleep. If you are finding it hard to fall back asleep, try a relaxation technique such as visualization (focus your eyes on something in the room), deep breathing, or meditation, which can be done without even getting out of bed. Remind yourself that although they’re not a replacement for sleep, rest and relaxation still help rejuvenate your body.

Stretching. If you wake during the night do NOT fight it or panic. If you can not go to sleep in 10 to 15 minutes, get up, wake 20 or 30 feet, stretch (touch your toes or stretch your arms), walk back to bed and lay back down again. Each time you stretch and lay down your body will produce a small amount of endorphins which help the body relax.

Postpone worrying and brainstorming. If you wake during the night feeling anxious about something, make a brief note of it on paper and postpone worrying about it until the next day when you are fresh and it will be easier to resolve. Similarly, if a brainstorm or great idea is keeping you awake, make a note of it on paper and fall back to sleep knowing you’ll be much more productive and creative after a good night’s rest.


#67 fishinghat

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 02:06 PM

Sorry, that did not copy well.


#68 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 09 March 2017 - 02:19 PM

FH: Thank you, thank you! It helps so much to feel understood. Tears . And what I read and see on here is so helpful and familiar.

These are new Doctors to me since we moved from another state a year ago.. My previous docs (although they loaded me up on these meds)
1) knew I don't like to take any pills if possible
2) believed me and knew I don't make stuff up

All my new docs here seem to automatically think " she's 54, she's fat, and wants a pill to fix it." Will print this info up, but at this point I think I need to find a new Psychiatrist, I have to wonder about her ability and experience when she couldn't detect I was in a very high state of anxiety, and didn't try to help me calm down. I may send the sleep Doc that info, just in hopes that he would have better understanding about Cymbalta and recognize it on his next patient. Don't know if or when I will go back to him.

I'm trying to be positive about this and I am going to focus on your helpful words. So good to feel understood. Blessings to you. You made my day.

#69 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 09 March 2017 - 02:28 PM

Woah, I just saw the last two posts, I only read the first one. Yes, I will fire the sleep doc too.

I will try the hydroxyzine and clonidine, but I've had increased anxiety on the hydroxyzine. Will the combination of the two work better? Should I give the Ambien a try? I've worked in health care and seen when A,bien doesn't work. So if I start doing anything weird I would quit. Appreciate your suggestions.

#70 fishinghat

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 02:52 PM

I now have doubts about the hydroxyzine for you because of the increased anxiety (although this could be from the withdrawal). I am on both and they work well together for me. Especially when the drs let me tweek doses up and down as needed because they know I will always try to minimize my meds. Be sure and check your bp first because both can lower it some. I am not a fan of Ambien because it is addictive and has a withdrawal. Although it is NOT a benzo it acts on the same synapses as a benzo. DO NOT take it with a benzo as it makes the benzo more addictive. Too many bad side effects for me.


#71 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 10 March 2017 - 05:12 PM

Please let me know if this isn't ok to ask here, it's about Ambien dosage. My Psyches office closed at noon and I guess I can't talk to her till Monday, that's 3 sleeps away. I started the Ambien last night, 5mg, my Psych wants to "start low". I took it as I was getting into bed at midnight, about as early as I dare start at right now. I fell asleep within half an hour I think, no anxiety, but woke up at 4:30 am. I looked up online about dosage and it looks like 10 mg is the next step so I took another 5 at that time. I know that's not the best way to go but I wanted O N E night of sleep. I feel peaceful and energetic today!

Now I'm wondering what to do over the weekend, should I try 10 mg at bedtime? I realize you aren't necessarily doctors but appreciate your thots and experience again.

#72 fishinghat

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 05:49 PM

I assume you must have gotten at least 5 or 6 hours sleep from the first 5 mg. When you took another 5 mg at 4:30 did you go right back to sleep and if so for how long?


#73 fishinghat

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 05:53 PM

Ambien has a half life of around 3 hours so there still would have been 25% of the original dose in your system at 4:30. Taking 1 and a half pills at bedtime (7.5 mg) should extend your sleep by 50%.


#74 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 10 March 2017 - 09:24 PM

Thank you, I'll give it a try.

#75 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 11 March 2017 - 05:24 PM

I took the 7.5 mg of Ambien and still woke up four hours later. I was able to fall asleep a few hours later, and I felt calm this morning.

Buuuut, we have family stopping by for a couple hours tonight and I might be in bed while they are here. My husband is cooking, but just trying to get the house looking ok is giving me incredible anxiety, I feel pressure in my head, like it's going to pop off. The family that is coming are people I can totally relax with, and they know what's going on with me. I see so few people, I think I have to try it when I can, but I may end up taking benedryl and going to bed. (Won't take the Ambien tonight then)

#76 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 12 March 2017 - 01:13 AM

108 Beads and Holding

Trying to tidy up our messy house for company was grueling today. Anxiety and pressure in my head. But once the work was done, I was better and enjoyed time with some sweet caring family who drove four hours out of their way to have supper and move on.

It's been a tough week with pretty extreme anxiety at my Dr appointments and then getting ready for company. I plan to hold where I'm at now for a week to hopefully stabilize.

#77 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 12 March 2017 - 11:17 AM

Wiped out today. Have a headache. But slept 8 hours.

#78 gail

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    5 months on cymbalta, scary side effects, never felt good.
    Needed understanding and support, and a place where I was not alone. To read others stories and realizing that I was not the only one going through all that crap.
    In hope that one day, I can return the favors in some kind of way.

Posted 12 March 2017 - 04:22 PM

Tfaff,

We do need to hold on to whatever positives that happen during the day. This is what you are doing and it's a good reminder for all of us, thank you!

#79 tfaff

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    I've taken 60 mg. Of Cymbalta for over 9 yrs. After feeling extreme fatigue for a long time, along with several other side effects, I am very motivated to slowly wean off of it and say goodbye to an aweful drug.

Posted 18 March 2017 - 11:23 PM

I've had a good week. I started taking Ambien for sleep, very scary move, but being up all night most nights, and having no energy ever, I have tried several other meds, and...now I'm sleeping. I sleep from about one am until 8:30 am and wake up ready to stay up. It's been amazing to have some productive days and spend time with my husband. We worked in the yard today, it was really nice. I feel, normal...right now.

So, I'm at 20 mg. Of Cymbalta, and will continue tapering.

Our daughter is getting married next month, it'll be a small wedding, and we have a new grand baby coming in April too, so I'll taper accordingly. I just hope I can be part of those events, we'll see.



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