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Cymbalta From 30 To 60 Mg


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#1 Bat

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Posted 19 November 2021 - 11:52 AM

Hello,

If i'm going up to 60 mg from 30 mg, is it better to take 60 mg on two doses? Or it doesn't matter or it is worse? I want to lessen the side effects.

Another question, i returned to cymbalta 30 mg from around 3 months. From two weeks, I did two blood tests in a week and i forgot to take cymbalta the same day they drew blood. My tinnitus is very high and i feel worse (sometimes good sometimes anxious). Does going 60 mg help lowering the tinnitus?

My homocysteine has come out of range (24 and the range is 14 max), my b12 is borderline (256) my active b12 after a week was good 69 (range is 29 to 169) my copper is low 62 (range 70 to 140) vitamine D is 15.5 lower than the range 30-100.

I Listed my results in case something causes the tinnitus and unsteadiness in mood and anxiety level other than cymbalta low dose.

Thanks so much for taking the time to read this.


#2 fishinghat

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Posted 19 November 2021 - 01:08 PM

Hi Bat

 

It seems like that making a big jump up or down in dose can bring on the tinnitus. In either case it usually settles down in a month or so.

 

Your homocysteine is probably low due to the low Vitamin B12 being borderline. The B vitamins help control the conversion of homocysteine to cysteine. You might check other B vitamins as well. Stress, including withdrawal, can cause some of the B vitamins to decline. Copper being low can be a dietary insufficiency but normally it is due to large doses of Vitamin C, zinc, iron, calcium or low blood levels of magnesium.

 

From the ebook...

 

Vitamin B12

Rainbow - I'm confused about the B12. My blood tests from LabCorp and Quest have shown B12 as pg/mL. I understand the conversion to ng/mL, however the standard ranges for both labs are 232-1,245 pg/mL and 200-1100 pg/mL. My doctors didn’t flag my level of 1,157 pg/mL because that’s within range with LabCorp.
I can tell you that 1 year prior, my B12 level was extremely low based on both these ranges, at 351 pg/mL, and that’s when I began taking the B Complex.
What are your thoughts given I’m currently “within range” for pg/mL?
 
Normal 180-914 ng/L which is obviously much different than the values for Labcorp.
FH - I can tell you that there are different methods to analyze for different chemicals and each method has its own 'normal' range but these values differ by a 1000 fold. That is very unusual. I have looked at several other sources and some agree with Mayo (above) and some agree with Labcorp. If your test was done by LabCorp and that is their normal range than I would go with that.
FH - This article discusses the various methods (12+/-) to analyze for Vitamin B12. Apparently there is a lot of variability in these methods. Each method also has different factors that can interfere with the analysis such as protein levels in the blood, mineral concentrations, medications and supplements, etc. Over the years I have done a lot of screening for heavy metals (lead, copper, iron, etc). and during those times have used at least 3 different methods to do the analysis. Variations in the 'normal' range would only be 5 to 10%. Nothing like what we are seeing here. Very surprised.
 
Taking vitamin B-12 with vitamin C might reduce the available amount of vitamin B-12 in your body. To avoid this interaction, take vitamin C two or more hours after taking a vitamin B-12 supplement.
 
This test may exhibit interference when sample is collected from a person who is consuming a supplement with a high dose of biotin (also termed as vitamin B7 or B8, vitamin H, or coenzyme R). It is recommended to ask all patients who may be indicated for this test about biotin supplementation. Patients should be cautioned to stop biotin consumption at least 72 hours prior to the collection of a sample.
 
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Your vitamin D levels probably need addressing. Low Vitamin D levels significantly effect neurotransmitters and usually makes withdrawals and/or updosing much more difficult. This is a possible connection to the tinnitus. You might talk to your dr about this.

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#3 Bat

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Posted 19 November 2021 - 03:22 PM

Thanks so much Hat
I'll try to address vitamin D deficiency for uping the dose.
Does getting 2 30 mg cymbalta 12 hours apart makes it easier on my body? Or you recommend taking the 60 mg pill?

#4 fishinghat

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Posted 19 November 2021 - 05:53 PM

I persomally think that 2 thirties 12 hours apart tend to even out any side effects.


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#5 invalidusername

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Posted 20 November 2021 - 07:52 PM

Hi Bat,

 

Agree with Hat about the two doses and getting things a little more even, but bear in mind that the peak plasma level will be partially reduced, but your system will get used to this.

 

Regarding the tinnitus, it is likely to make a difference as there are serotonin receptors in the inner ear, so they - along with all other serotonergic receptors - will be used to the levels from the meds. When changed, you can anticipate a change which could quite easily be tinnitus in your case.

 

IUN


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#6 Bat

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Posted 21 November 2021 - 05:18 AM

Thanks so much Hat and IUN you are very helpful.



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