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New Cymbalta User Help


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#1411 invalidusername

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 06:49 PM

I hate to jump in on this one, and I am never one to go against anything Hat has to say, however, from the research that I have carried out following my father's diagnosis of Parkinson's and speaking with the UCL where my father volunteers (UKPDC), I would say there is a very strong argument that my father's 20 years on AD's caused his condition.

 

But... you need to bear in mind his age when he was taking it, and the brains degradation of neuroplasticity capabilities.

 

At your age AJ, I would certainly say there is very little to be worried about. But I for sure wouldn't stay on them any longer than is needed. 


#1412 fishinghat

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 07:42 AM

Good point IUN. I had forgotten the PD connection. Good catch.


#1413 Axlejames

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 12:23 PM

What I am trying to pin point is my lack of being able to settle my thoughts and lack of trust in myself could that be because my brain needs to heal ? Feeding my doubts so much can that be attributed to my brain not functioning properly as I come off SSRI ?


#1414 frog

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 01:08 PM

Axle I can't remember if you're still tapering or off Cymbalta completely, but fear was a huge component of the first months of my recovery. I didn't taper properly toward the end (jumped off completely around 18mg when i started seeing some withdrawal effects rear their head) I was actually doing relatively ok for the first 3 weeks and then (this is just my theory) I did a really challenging exercise class and I think it spiked my adrenaline. Since my body had no Cymbalta to control and my brain didn't fully have control yet either, I think it caused everything to go into an overblown crazy stress response while my brain and body figured out what the hell to do.

 

I think when your body is in major stress mode, the more rational parts of the brain take a backseat to the more primal survival stuff like anxiety and fear. I've been off Cymbalta for over 7 months at this point and I can say definitively that all my emotions felt EXTRA heightened during that time, especially fears and worries. It was like one scared thought would pop into my head and my brain would grab on to it and start ruminating on it endlessly until I felt completely hopeless. For me this mostly pertained to being scared of never getting better. 

 

At the time both FH and IUN kept saying that this emotional intensity fades and will pass. I trusted them but it was hard to believe while going through it. Everything feels very raw and intense during this phase. Well I can now speak from my own experience. This does get better. A lot better. I still have my days that feel very out of my control with emotions that make no sense. But they're much rarer and I can much better rationalize my way through them. Your brain will continue to get better with time. There's no doubt about that. 


#1415 Axlejames

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 02:58 PM

Axle I can't remember if you're still tapering or off Cymbalta completely, but fear was a huge component of the first months of my recovery. I didn't taper properly toward the end (jumped off completely around 18mg when i started seeing some withdrawal effects rear their head) I was actually doing relatively ok for the first 3 weeks and then (this is just my theory) I did a really challenging exercise class and I think it spiked my adrenaline. Since my body had no Cymbalta to control and my brain didn't fully have control yet either, I think it caused everything to go into an overblown crazy stress response while my brain and body figured out what the hell to do.

 

I think when your body is in major stress mode, the more rational parts of the brain take a backseat to the more primal survival stuff like anxiety and fear. I've been off Cymbalta for over 7 months at this point and I can say definitively that all my emotions felt EXTRA heightened during that time, especially fears and worries. It was like one scared thought would pop into my head and my brain would grab on to it and start ruminating on it endlessly until I felt completely hopeless. For me this mostly pertained to being scared of never getting better. 

 

At the time both FH and IUN kept saying that this emotional intensity fades and will pass. I trusted them but it was hard to believe while going through it. Everything feels very raw and intense during this phase. Well I can now speak from my own experience. This does get better. A lot better. I still have my days that feel very out of my control with emotions that make no sense. But they're much rarer and I can much better rationalize my way through them. Your brain will continue to get better with time. There's no doubt about that. 

I have been off cymbalta for about 2 years they replaced it with zoloft I have been off Zoloft and Lamotragine for about 3 months I have been on SSRI though for about 8 years 


#1416 fishinghat

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 03:57 PM

Snri or ssri, in either case these types of antidepressants effect the serotonin levels in the brain. More particularly the amygdala and hippocampus which are the centers for OCD, paranoia, fear as well as anxiety. These unstable serotonin levels cause us to become unsure of ourselves and second guess everything we do. As frog said. It will pass with time.


#1417 Axlejames

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 04:05 PM

Snri or ssri, in either case these types of antidepressants effect the serotonin levels in the brain. More particularly the amygdala and hippocampus which are the centers for OCD, paranoia, fear as well as anxiety. These unstable serotonin levels cause us to become unsure of ourselves and second guess everything we do. As frog said. It will pass with time.

Awesome definetly answered my question thanks as always Fish and God bless


#1418 invalidusername

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 04:56 PM

Frog that was a great response and a really good read.

 

"I think it caused everything to go into an overblown crazy stress response while my brain and body figured out what the hell to do."

 

I had a bit of a LOL moment to myself when I read that part, purely because it is so very true!

 

AJ - my theory is that more of the thinking and "so-called" rationalising passes over the to amygdala (the primitive "old brain") when chaos rules in the frontal lobe and prefrontal cortex which is responsible for emotional processing. 

 

Usually decisions are held back long enough for the front brain to make sense and rationalise your moods and decisions, but the old brain works so much quicker - so what happens is when we are anxious, we default these processes to the old brain which is primitavely fight or flight... whereas the front brain will say "woh - hang on a minute - lets have a think about this" and calms things down before jumping to conclusions.

 

I hope this makes sense. There are some great books which I think you would find useful. The Chimp Paradox is one that immediately springs to mind. 


#1419 frog

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 05:33 PM

Totally agree with you IUN. I also found that (and still do to an extent) I struggled with any kind of decision making. I generally get a little stressed out about making choices because I tend to overthink things, but throughout the Cymbalta recovery I would IMMEDIATELY become insanely overwhelmed. Literally even when my husband would ask what kind of tea I wanted, I would get worked up...


#1420 invalidusername

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 05:42 PM

Oh yes. Classic symptom. For me it was getting the last of the mayo out of the jar. 

 

Stupid silly things. 


#1421 Axlejames

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 08:03 AM

Totally agree with you IUN. I also found that (and still do to an extent) I struggled with any kind of decision making. I generally get a little stressed out about making choices because I tend to overthink things, but throughout the Cymbalta recovery I would IMMEDIATELY become insanely overwhelmed. Literally even when my husband would ask what kind of tea I wanted, I would get worked up...

My issue is more of I will make a decision and tell myself I will stick to it. Make up my mind then Ill go back and recheck if that was the right decision over and over again. Like planting a seed and digging it up everyday to see if anything is growing yet. I do this a lot with the God and spirituality questions which  drives me insane constantly. I will say tho the longer I am off my meds and the more Time I give this the easier it has gotten to make up my mind and stick with it. 


#1422 frog

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 12:59 PM

That's great! I think in your scenario (and it sounds like you're already doing this) there's also something to be said on trying to actively work on changing your own mental habits. In my opinion withdrawal mostly intensifies and amplifies our existing predispositions (with some exceptions for anxieties that get created as a direct result of battling the withdrawal for months on end). The brain loves to habituate, but fortunately it seems like the newer created thought patterns and habits are easiest to resolve, and of course the ones we've used for years or decades are the hardest. Research suggests it takes at least 2 months to form a new habit, potentially much longer if it's a more challenging habit. And breaking an old habit is very similar, because supposedly it's not possible to completely get rid of the neural response in our brain that corresponds to a particular habit. The key is to replace it with a better habit and then that neural connection becomes the stronger more dominant one and the old one basically gets put on the back burner. Fascinating stuff!





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