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New Cymbalta Taper Bead Counting Generic Brand


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#1 KatyB

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 07:10 PM

Hi there! I am a 37 year old female. I have been on Cymbalta for about 2 years now. I have experienced some weight gain that has been more than frustrating. I have always been active with a slim, athletic build. Since being on Cymbalta I have put on weight in places I never experienced prior. I know I am getting older and metabolism slows down. But no matter how I exercise or diet, the weight stays the same. Overall I have gain +25 lbs in 2 years. Not cool! I also have noticed some blurry vision from time to time. Like my eyes have troubles focusing on text every now and then. After reading all the other horrible symptoms of withdrawal, I am convinced this drug should not be in my system. There, I am eager to start my tapering process!

 

From everything I have read here, it seems like bead counting is going to be the best method for me.

 

I am on 30mg of generic Cymbalta (duloxetine) twice daily (AM/PM). I counted the beads and found 108 in one 30mg capsule. 30mg x2 daily = 60mg = 216 beads I am ingesting on a daily basis. 

 

If I remove 1 bead per capsule (thus removing 2 beads per day) that schedule puts me at 108 days for my taper. Roughly 15 weeks. Starting today I will be finished right after the New Year.  :D

 

Can anyone confirm that this would be a gentle taper method? Is there a better taper method to avoid as many adverse affects as possible?

 

Thank you all in advance for your courage to go before and pave the way for Cymbalta free lives! 

 

Fingers cross there is life after Cymbalta! (and maybe my skinny jeans, too! haha!)

 

xoxo

KatyB


#2 invalidusername

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 09:30 PM

Hi Katy and welcome to the forum.

 

Weight gain can often be the proverbial pain in the rear-end with these things, and I am sure in time, this will reverse for you. If you have been taking Dulox for 2 years, a 3 month taper may work, but I would anticipate keeping a few weeks spare at the end. A bead per dose would be a good place to start, but as you get further towards your end-goal, it would be wise to drop that rate. Your body will tell you when that will be, but even if you do feel that all is running well, we always suggest that the last 10mg is taken at a cautious pace - prevention is far better than cure with these things. 

 

So I'd go ahead with the bead per dose and keep in touch and let us know how things are going at the relevant intervals. 

 

As well as preparing the dose adjustment, have you considered supplements for your taper? There are a few things which you should have at the ready to make your journey a little easier. Unless you are one of the exceptional few who glide through this procedure, there will be some ugly times ahead which can be smoothed out with the right supplement. I would suggest downloading our eBook and having a ready through so you are prepared - but you can always ask us here if you are not sure.

 

Let me know if there is anything else we can help with. Others will no doubt be along in the morning to greet you, but for now, strap yourself in and give it your all!!

 

IUN


#3 KatyB

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 08:27 AM

Hi IUN!

 

Thank you SO much for the words of encouragement!!! I am definitely apprehensive about this journey. But I am determined I need to start! 

 

I will absolutely keep filling my prescription for as long as I need to. Great advice!! 

 

Fantastic words of wisdom regarding the last 10mg!! B/c my dosage is 60mg for the entire day, would you say the last 10mg of challenge would be 5mg per pill? Or 10mg per pill and in essence 20mg per day? 

 

I was not aware of the eBook! Thanks for pointing that out! I am a huge fan of supplements--I take Magnesium daily and have taken other supplements on and off over the years. So I am grateful to know about these!!!

 

Thank you so much for the support! I will be a regular here as I go through this journey! :)

 

xoxo

KatyB


#4 KatyB

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 08:33 AM

Hi again!

 

Where exactly is the eBook located? 

 

Also, it tinnitus (ringing in the ears) a symptom of using Dulox? That has been another side effect I have experienced in these two years.

 

xoxo

KatyB


#5 fishinghat

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 08:47 AM

Welcome Katy

 

First of all I would like to re-emphasize what IUN said about the last 10 mg. It must be taken super slow. That is referring to 10 mg for the total dose for a day.

 

Also most that gained the weight found that the weight came back off after being free of Cymbalta for a few months.

 

A word of caution about the magnesium supplement. Magnesium should NOT be taken within 2 hours of any other supplement or prescription and that includes Cymbalta as it effects the absorption rate. Also magnesium can increase anxiety levels in some people and also limits the amount of calcium your body can absorb which can lead to low calcium especially on women.

 

Please keep us posted on how you are doing. We are always here for you.


#6 KatyB

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 08:59 AM

Hi fishinghat!

 

Thank you so much for the support! I really appreciate it!

 

Wow--I had no idea about the magnesium!! Thank you SO much for sharing that!! The magnesium I've been taking is from the Natural Calm magnesium gummies. I take them at night before bed. But maybe I need to stop taking those.

 

I need all the tips available for this process!!!

 

xoxo

KatyB


#7 invalidusername

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 09:13 AM

Hi again Katy.

 

You are more than welcome for our support. And Hat made a very good point about the magnesium being taken a good 2 hours (at very minimum) away from your Dulox. He is also correct in pointing out the possibility of anxiety - this is usually at higher doses, but worth keeping in mind.

 

You can download the eBook directly from this post;

 

https://www.cymbalta...tion-the-ebook/

 

This will cover bead counting, magnesium and so much more. But again, if you are unsure, just ask!

 

All manner of ear related issues can be had during withdrawal. There are serotonin receptors in the ear which are affected by the drug, which can cause ringing in ears, slight hearing loss, dizziness and balance issues - among others. Please do not let this fear you. Keep telling yourself that it is the withdrawal - and again, if you are not sure, please ask.

 

Let's get going with shedding that weight dear girl. We are right behind you...

 

IUN 


#8 invalidusername

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 09:18 AM

Have a read of pages 230-231 of the book Katy. It is a good write up from Hat about magnesium deficiency. This will give you a clear idea of what will be the result of having low levels.


#9 KatyB

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:14 PM

Fabulous!! Thank you SO much IUN!!! My Sunday afternoon read!!! I will keep you all posted as I get along!!!

 

xoxo

KatyB


#10 invalidusername

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:34 PM

Again - you are most welcome - and have awarded you your first "like" as you are so gracious with your words!

 

Will look forward to hearing from you as you go.

 

God Bless


#11 fishinghat

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 09:03 AM

Good morning Katy

 

I noticed those gummies have quite a bit of sugar in them. That will not help the anxiety either, especially be fore going to bed.  Just a thought.


#12 KatyB

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 11:22 AM

Hello, me again, KatyB :)

I have been successfully tapering and have gotten down to 10 beads twice a day. Without any side effects. And then they hit me. Boo! So I've been pouring over the PDF of recommended medicines to help with symptoms. Last night I took a 25mg benadryl and felt amazing. But I was reading maybe I can't take it long term as it loses its effectiveness? I wasn't sure if I could take one every 4-6 hours until the side effects are no longer present? I also was reading about the pseudoephedrine meds and those sound promising as well. Is there one you all recommend trying first over any others? Rummaging in my medicine cabinet I have a 12-hour Sudafed 120mg of pseduo in it. That specific medicine wasn't listed in the PDF so I wasn't sure if maybe it wasn't the best?

 

I've also had terrible stomach pains. So have started taking some pepto--but again, not sure if I can take it non-stop until the symptoms stop? :) Maybe alternating Tums/pepto?

 

I am now holding steady with the 10 beads twice a day. But my next taper would be to go to 9 beads twice per day. and so forth. But probably holding steady for a while. I know I need to be patient with this process!

 

I am so grateful for your understanding with this issue! Your experience and knowledge are invaluable! I feel like you all are the Lighthouses on a dark and stormy night! : ) Keep on shining brightly for all of us still in the midst of trials!!

 

xoxo

KatyB


#13 fishinghat

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 02:12 PM

Just as good as Benadryl is sublingual melatonin. There is a trick to it though. Much of the melatonin you by is 5 to 10 mg but that high a dose will actually hurt your sleeping. The recommended dose is 0.3 mg to help you sleep and that works for me BUT 0.2 mg will really relax me and calm me down without being drowsy. Of course you may have to play with the dose a little to see what works for you. Also many find omega 3 (3000 mg/day) which is high in epa and dha very helpful as well. There are several others to try as well but I thought this would be a goof beginning point.

Be careful with the pseudoephedrine. In about 10% of the people it makes the anxiety worse. If that happens it wears off in about 8 to 10 hours.

#14 fishinghat

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 02:28 PM

As far as the stomach goes I would not recommend any stomach meds which contain magnesium as they interfer with the absorption of Cymbalta. Things that can help include a warm pad on the stomach, eating smaller meals, use of a ppi sometimes helps, and most important do not drink anything cold or hot. The stomach is irritated and is veru sensitive. Room temperature or slightly warm only.

#15 KatyB

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 04:32 PM

Hi Fishinghat!

Thank you for the advice! would you say the melatonin is to relax? It seems like the benadryl took away my zaps and body aches. it probably made me relax too.... :) are antihistamines known to alleviate zaps and aches?

 

Good words on the smaller portions of eating! That helps to remember my stomach is very sensitive. And over stretching it with large portions is not helpful! And great advice on no hot or cold foods!

 

I have also been exercising daily. When I am spinning on the bike I feel no symptoms at all. It's when I stop or am not busy that I really notice my symptoms.

 

again, thank you for all your words of wisdom!!

 

xoxo

KatyB


#16 fishinghat

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 05:09 PM

Melatonin will help you relax but too much will make you very drowsy.

Some histamines help with zaps and/or aches and some don't. It depends on which histamine receptors the react with.

Mild exercise during withdrawal may be Ok but many members found that heavy exercise makes the withdrawal symptoms far worse the next day. Heavy exercise will cause the body to produce more adrenaline which can worsen anxiety and also buts a general strain on an already stressed body.

And thanks for the kind words KatyB. Always glad to help when I can.

#17 KatyB

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 09:04 AM

Hello there! So it's been a while and I have successfully tapered off cymbalta. My journey has been tough, but I am on the other side. (I can go into things that helped me through in another comment if it would be helpful to anyone).

 

However, the symptoms for why I went on Cymbalta in the first place have now begun to return. :( I was put on it to alleviate my chronic nerve pain in my head. Basically occipital neuralgia was the diagnosis. And cymbalta was the miracle I was looking for--my pain completely went away. 

 

But after a few years on it, the side effects were getting bothersome (weight gain, night sweats, excessive bruising, etc.) which is why I embarked on my taper.

 

My last dose (bead) was Oct 22nd 2019. About a month ago, my stabbing head pain started creeping back in again. And now I am right back where I started--daily head pain.

 

Does anyone have any suggestions for alternate medications for chronic nerve pain? I would be grateful for any suggestions!

 

I have come this far and I do not want to go back on cymbalta again.

 

xoxo Katie B


#18 fishinghat

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 09:57 AM

First of all, congratulations Katie. That is a major achievement. Well done.

 

The pain you are experiencing is called rebound pain and will reduce some over the next 6 months and should level off around the level of your original pain.

 

As far as handling chronic nerve pain?,,,,Well if I had an answer to that I would be rich. There are so many pain meds and unluckily most are opioid derivatives and carry a mess of side effects and withdrawal issues. My wife has had 4 back surgeries and the best thing she has come across is pregabalin (Lyrica). It does have a moderate withdrawal but can be dealt with if tapered slowly. I wish I could be of more help. If you find a pain med that is of interest to you let me know, I will probably have a lot of info on it in my "medical library" on my computer.

 

Once again, well done !!!


#19 KatyB

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 10:17 AM

Thanks Fishinghat! :) I could not have done it without the help of your compiled PDF! The information in there is a gold mine!

 

How about Effexor? From what I can read online it seems very similar to Cymbalta...

 

thanks!

Katie B


#20 KatyB

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 10:46 AM

Also, Wellbutrin?


#21 fishinghat

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 12:35 PM

Effexor is very similar to Cymbalta in its performance and withdrawal. Wellbutrin is a different animal. It effects mostly dopamine and not serotonin and norepinephrine and not serotonin and norepinephrine like Cymbalta does. I don't recall ever hearing of anyone using it for chronic nerve pain but will check.

#22 fishinghat

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 12:58 PM

Is your chronic pain neuropathic?

Neuropathic pain - Pain that originates in peripheral nerves or the central nervous system rather than in other damaged organs or tissues. A hallmark of neuropathic pain is its localization to specific dermatomes or nerve distributions.

Most research seems to indicate that gabapentin (Neurontin) and pregabalin (Lyrica) are the most effective at bringing releif of neuropathic pain for some patients.


https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/10741812
Efficacy of sustained-release bupropion in neuropathic pain: an open-label study.
This uncontrolled pilot study suggests that bupropion may be an effective and tolerated treatment for some patients with neuropathic pain.

https://onlinelibrar....pto_96696601.x
Antidepressants in the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain
A recent study on bupropion, which is a noradrenaline and dopamine uptake inhibitor, indicated a surprisingly high efficacy of this drug in peripheral neuropathic pain. In conclusion, antidepressants represent useful tools in neuropathic pain treatment and must still be considered as first line treatments of neuropathic pain. However, without head‐to‐head comparisons between antidepressants and other analgesics, it is not possible to provide real evidence‐based treatment algorithms for neuropathic pain.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/15712623
Antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs for chronic non-cancer pain.
The development of newer classes of antidepressants and second-generation antiepileptic drugs has created unprecedented opportunities for the treatment of chronic pain. These drugs modulate pain transmission by interacting with specific neurotransmitters and ion channels. The actions of antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs differ in neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain, and agents within each medication class have varying degrees of efficacy. Tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, nortriptyline, desipramine) and certain novel antidepressants (i.e., bupropion, venlafaxine, duloxetine) are effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The analgesic effect of these drugs is independent of their antidepressant effect and appears strongest in agents with mixed-receptor or predominantly noradrenergic activity, rather than serotoninergic activity. First-generation antiepileptic drugs (i.e., carbamazepine, phenytoin) and second-generation antiepileptic drugs (e.g., gabapentin, pregabalin) are effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The efficacy of antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain is comparable; tolerability also is comparable, but safety and side effect profiles differ. Tricyclic antidepressants are the most cost-effective agents, but second-generation antiepileptic drugs are associated with fewer safety concerns in elderly patients. Tricyclic antidepressants have documented (although limited) efficacy in the treatment of fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. Recent evidence suggests that duloxetine and pregabalin have modest efficacy in patients with fibromyalgia.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/16202958
A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of bupropion sustained release in chronic low back pain.
Antidepressant medications that have both noradrenergic and serotonergic effects appear to have greater efficacy in patients with chronic low back pain than those with only serotonergic activity. We studied bupropion because it inhibits the reuptake of both norepinephrine and dopamine, but found no evidence of efficacy in patients with non-neuropathic chronic low back pain.

There are many many articles like these.


#23 KatyB

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 07:54 PM

Hi FishingHat!

 

Thank you for all these studies! I don't THINK my pain is neuropathic. It seems like my headache pain radiates on side of my skull. From the neck, base of the skull, crawling up towards the top of my head. It's only ever on one side. My skull is tender to the touch. When I take a muscle relaxer, the pain dissipates. 

 

My doctor prescribed me Cymbalta as a last resort. I had multiple nerve block injections into my spine. Which helped but only for a few days.

 

I also tried cutting out all the migraine inducing trigger foods from my diet. I was very strict. And still my head pain persisted.

 

Cymbalta basically deadened the nerves and took away my head pain. But it took away so much more, too!

 

I had a pretty bad flare up of pain over the weekend. I have been tempted to retreat back to Cymbalta for the pain relief it brought. But I have remained strong. Dealing with the pain. Still searching for a better answer.

 

Thank you for all your words of encouragement and helpful studies!!!

 

xoxo

Katie B


#24 fishinghat

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 10:01 AM

Katie, sorry about the pain suffering. My wife has suffered through 4 back surgeries so she lives in constant pain as well. A new technology has recently come to my attention. It is called Kailin Patches. They contain no chemicals!! It is nanotechnology which sets up a electromagnetic pulse that interferes with the pain signal. The technology was developed by the military and released for public use in May of 2019. I have ordered a couple patches for the wife and am currently doing research on the technology. In a few weeks I will be posting information on these patches in the Medical Support section.


#25 invalidusername

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:22 PM

Will very much look forward to that, Hat.





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