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Article: "freeze, Flight, Fight, Fright, Faint"


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#1 FiveNotions

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 08:17 PM

Freeze, Flight, Fight, Fright, Faint: Adaptationist Perspectives on the
Acute Stress Response Spectrum (2004, abstract only)
http://cogprints.org...nt.pdf?q=fright

Abstract:
This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia).

In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed.

Specifically, that fear–induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival response to an inescapable threat. The article suggests that faintness evolved in response to middle paleolithic intra-group and inter-group violence (of con-specifics) rather than as a pan-mammalian defense response, as is presently assumed.

Based on recent literature, freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint provides a more complete description of the human acute stress response sequence than current descriptions.

Faintness, one of three primary physiological reactions involved in BIITS phobia, is extremely rare in other phobias. Since heritability estimates are higher for faintness than for fears or phobias, the author suggests that trait-faintness may be a useful complement to trait-anxiety as an endophenotype in research on the human fear circuitry. Some implications for the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as well as for clinical, health services, and transcriptomic research are briefly discussed.

#2 FiveNotions

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 08:32 PM

Exploring Human Freeze Responses to a Threat Stressor (2009, full article)
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2489204/

Abstract:
Despite the fundamental nature of tonic immobility in anxiety responses, surprisingly little empirical research has focused on the “freeze” response in humans. The present report evaluated frequency and predictors of a freeze response in the context of a biological challenge. A nonclinical sample (N = 404) underwent a 20-sec inhalation of 20% CO2/balance O2.

 

Perceptions of immobility in the context of the challenge were reported in 13% of the sample, compared to 20% reporting a significant desire to flee.

 

Subjective anxiety and panic during the challenge were associated with the freeze response, as were a number of anxiety symptom dimensions.


#3 FiveNotions

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 08:50 PM

Aversive Life Events Enhance Human Freezing Responses (2012, full article)
http://dare.ubvu.vu.....pdf?sequence=1

From the abstract: "These results indicate that aversive life events affect automatic
freezing responses and may indicate the cumulative effect of multiple trauma. The experimental
paradigm presented is a promising method to study freezing as a primary defense response in trauma related
disorders."

#4 FiveNotions

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 09:05 PM

And, as a cure for insomnia, here is a 500+ page book ... I searched the text, and it doesn't include discussions of the "freeze" aspect of anxiety ... but it has a lot of other very interesting information ... the last section focuses on pharmacological treatment of various types of anxiety and related disorders....

Behavioral Neurobiology of Anxiety and its Treatment
http://www.researchg...ece.pdf#page=86


#5 DoneWithCrap

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 01:07 AM

You have been very busy FN!
The article on aversive life events explains a lot about how and why I react the way I do. Freeze frozen solid. Damn! A scored 11 events by the time I was 5 years old and it didn't end until.... Well I guess I don't know if it will ever end for me but i have only had a few aversive events in the past 10 years compared to constant trauma well into my teen years. I have always felt that I was born with a mark on my aura that said "I'm trash. Do whatever you want to me because I'm no good" I'm still convinced it is there but I'm so used to it that I can't imagine life without trying to hide under a rock. All I have ever wanted was to be invisible. That used to be my super power! But my therapist took my super powers away :(

#6 FiveNotions

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 11:23 AM

These aren't the "researchy" sorts of items on "fight, flight, freeze" required by my new freelance gig ... but they're worth sharing here ... sort of the "Zen of Anxiety" ... many of TMs suggestions are echoed here ...

Survive and Thrive: How to Transform Anxiety into Inspiration
http://zenhabits.net...to-inspiration/

The website on which the above article is posted is interesting ...
http://zenhabits.net/

#7 gail

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 01:16 PM

Renee, your post did strike a cord here.

Childhood traumas, like imprinted in the cells.

They have a way to pop up at the least reminder, even in unconscious ways, and send us in a tail spin.

Speaking of being invisible, you reminded me that around 2003, I had a nervous breakdown .
For a few months, when driving my car and at stop signs I would wonder if people saw me, I had the feeling of being invisible. I made extra long stops.

Of course all that being linked with childhood traumas, not being recognized or given value.

The crawling under a rock is my favorite expression when in deep anxiety.

We all have hidden or unconscious beliefs, one that is general is the one that says I AM NOT GOOD ENOUGH! Or simply not enough. And we keep on believing in the lies we tell ourselves!

As This moment once said, we become what we practice.

Could be time for us to practice something else, and stop believing in the lies we are holding onto!

Lies, they are lies.

#8 FiveNotions

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 01:28 PM

And it occurs to me that as children, we don't have option/power to fight, or to flee ... we're powerless, the only defense we have available to us is to "freeze" and to will/wish ourselves to disappear/be invisible (I used to hide in closets and climb to the top of our roof or a favorite tree) ... it only makes sense then that as we mature, unless we unlearn that and learn that we do have power and we do have choices, we of course react the only way we've ever know ... we freeze ...

#9 thismoment

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 02:15 PM

Many of our animal cousins surely exhibit the flight/fight/freeze condition in moments of fear. The freeze element would be a good strategy to avoid getting eaten in many cases: if your fight would be ineffective, and your flight might get you caught, then perhaps your freeze (combined with your natural camouflage) would keep you safe until your flight could be successful-- I've watched wild hares do this. Flight/fight/freeze is real and natural, and this might be one reasonable explanation.


#10 DoneWithCrap

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 07:03 PM

Like how the opossum "plays dead" 


#11 fishinghat

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 01:09 PM

This article has a very good discussion on "freeze".

 

http://ashokgupta.tv...ses-article.pdf


#12 Geebers

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 07:19 PM

Thanks for being a safe place. 2 weeks without Cymbalta and have been a real trooper,if I do say so myself. I always had a little discomfort when looking at some patterns. It's been getting worse. Today,I Googled it and it's a real thing called Trypophobia. I am not afraid of the patterns,but they cause anxiety. Has anyone experienced this when withdrawing from Cymbalta? Have other anxieties developed. The numbness of my tongue is also causing an anxious feeling. Again, no fear just anxiety. Feel like crying,but I already am!

#13 Carleeta

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 10:04 AM

Geebers.

 

You have a safe place here for sure.  Yes, you certainly have been a real trooper, I'm very proud of you.  Yes, you are going to have these patters and eventually within time you will see a bigger space between the patterns.  Your symptoms should become farther apart in time.  How long the time is depends on the individual.  There is an average here, although Fishinghat has the knowledge to answer this one.

 

Thank you for sharing...


#14 fishinghat

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 06:56 PM

Trypophobia, a new term for me and I sure don't remember any old posts on that fear of patterns. Usually each of these symptoms that develop during Cymbalta withdrawal (except the anxiety/emotional swings) will last for about 4 to 6 weeks before they change to something else.


#15 gail

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 07:24 AM

Freeze, Flight, Fight, Fright, Faint: Adaptationist Perspectives on theAcute Stress Response Spectrum (2004, abstract only)http://cogprints.org...nt.pdf?q=frightAbstract:This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia).In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed.Specifically, that fear–induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival response to an inescapable threat. The article suggests that faintness evolved in response to middle paleolithic intra-group and inter-group violence (of con-specifics) rather than as a pan-mammalian defense response, as is presently assumed.Based on recent literature, freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint provides a more complete description of the human acute stress response sequence than current descriptions.Faintness, one of three primary physiological reactions involved in BIITS phobia, is extremely rare in other phobias. Since heritability estimates are higher for faintness than for fears or phobias, the author suggests that trait-faintness may be a useful complement to trait-anxiety as an endophenotype in research on the human fear circuitry. Some implications for the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as well as for clinical, health services, and transcriptomic research are briefly discussed.


FiveNotions, we miss you and I think that it's good to bring this post up.

#16 fishinghat

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 09:02 AM

Interesting. A couple things come to mind. There is no discussion in this article about the drop in blood flow to the brain during stress. The brain will direct blood flow away from the brain and digestive tract to the muscles and heart so we can have the energy needed to fight or flight. This lack of blood flow is what leads to dizziness, fainting, difficulty in thinking clearly, and panic.

Ahh, Five Notions. Yes you are truly missed. You contributed so much and are such a dear person.

#17 gail

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 06:59 AM

Fishinghat, what you just said is real interesting.

Lack of blood flow can't be prevented???? Which comes first, panic and difficulty in thinking followed by lack of blood flow or lack of blood flow followed by panic?

What causes lack of blood flow concerning fainting, dizziness?

This would be a great subject to add to "And the answer to your question is?"
Thank you sir!

#18 fishinghat

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 12:26 PM

Good idea Gail. Somewhere in our archives is a document called Chronic Adrenergic State which describes the body's reaction to stress. Of course we are all aware that during periods of high stress adrenaline is released immediately. As it flows through the body it constricts the arteries in stomach and internal organs except the heart and muscles where is increases blood flow. It also decreases blood flow to the brain causing the lack of focus, panic and confusion. If the blood flow to the brain is reduced too much you get dizziness or even fainting.

I will be sure to get that in the document before I am done.

#19 gail

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 07:40 AM

Sir, how I wish to be 20 again, I would study this, become a doctor. It is so interesting.

But I am sure lucky to have you as a professor at my age.

Besides, at 20,I was too invested in finding a boyfriend to do anything else. And I did not have the brain to understand this.(too many falls on my head, I think)

To sir, with love! Thank you.



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