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If Non-Addictive Why Withdrawal Issues?


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#1 scared60

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    Had a scary incident, now thinking of getting off Cymbalta. I came for advice, support and friendship.

Posted 14 October 2015 - 05:44 PM

Back in 2008 when I was prescribed cymbalta for fibromyalgia, i clearly asked if this was addictive. Was told no. But now having tried to come off cymbalta several times, I wonder what nonaddictive really means. If not addictive, why the documented withdrawals? We all know Eli Lily didnt inform doctors of all the problems with cymbalta. I dont fault the docs just Eli Lily, but legally, seems you cant have withdrawal symptoms from a non-addictive medication. Seems an attorney could prove that somehow.

Need some wiser than I to give their take on nonaddtive/eithdrawal question. Thanks

#2 fishinghat

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 07:09 PM

FYI

Medical Dictionary

addiction

noun ad·dic·tion \ə-ˈdik-shən\

Medical Definition of ADDICTION

: compulsive physiological need for and use of a habit-forming substance (as heroin, nicotine, or alcohol) characterized by tolerance and by well-defined physiological symptoms upon withdrawal; broadly : persistent compulsive use of a substance known by the user to be physically, psychologically, or socially harmful


#3 scared60

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 08:00 PM

Well of course I looked for the exact definition of addiction as well as withdrawal, but thanks for the reminder, anyhooo ...

My point is we or I was told Non Addictive - if El Lily knew of the addictive qualities and actually told docs not addictive then they are for sure liable for our withdrawal issues.

I knew when I started taking oxycodone for my back paln, that it was addictive and when i detox off that drug, i know what to expect.

ElibLily took away my/our right to go forward knowing the risks.

Im just saying ....

#4 BelaLugosisDad

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Posted 16 October 2015 - 06:02 AM

FYI

Medical Dictionary

addiction

noun ad·dic·tion \ə-ˈdik-shən\

Medical Definition of ADDICTION

: compulsive physiological need for and use of a habit-forming substance (as heroin, nicotine, or alcohol) characterized by tolerance and by well-defined physiological symptoms upon withdrawal; broadly : persistent compulsive use of a substance known by the user to be physically, psychologically, or socially harmful

Which is why by the medical definition of Addiction cigarettes are not addictive. I know this sounds counter intuitive but one needs to think about characterized by tolerance; Cigarette smokers don't develop tolerance.

 

​It is important to understand that the definition of Addiction was changed around the time of DSM 3, quite conveniently before the launch of Prozac. This was not a coincidence & Prof. Peter  Goetsche has written about this in flawless referenced detail.

 


#5 gail

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 10:47 AM

Which is why by the medical definition of Addiction cigarettes are not addictive. I know this sounds counter intuitive but one needs to think about characterized by tolerance; Cigarette smokers don't develop tolerance.
 
​It is important to understand that the definition of Addiction was changed around the time of DSM 3, quite conveniently before the launch of Prozac. This was not a coincidence & Prof. Peter  Goetsche has written about this in flawless referenced detail.



Something to read!

#6 fishinghat

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 11:01 AM

Good point Gail.

The key is the "compulsive physiological need". Feeling a compulsive or driven need to do something is a strong desire to do something and is linked to a drastic change in dopamine levels in the brain. That change is due to the addictive drug (opium, heroin, meth, etc.) and that is why these addictive drugs are referred to as 'dope' from the word dopamine. Ssri/snri are not addictive as they don't develop this overwhelming desire for the drug when you wean off.

#7 BSoil

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 07:31 PM

Because if a drug increases chemicals in the brain such as serotonin and noepinephrine, your brain will become accustomed to it.


#8 invalidusername

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 07:42 PM

Exactly - the whole neuroplasticity and all that!

 

What's with the link to the black seed oil BSoil?? Interesting as it is a new one on me for withdrawal.

 

And welcome to the site, Sir!!





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